Tell Them How You Really Feel

Despite the lack of a new blog post, I’ve thought on this long and hard.

In between, that is, working on “my studio.” Which is a small, cold bedroom/library in the basement that has bad lighting and a whistling vent that I can’t figure out why it whistles and so if I ever utilize the studio, I will have just turn off the heat and freeze while I narrate. I’m within the learning curve between buying and setting up the equipment and downloading and using the software.  You know? This could be another blog post altogether. I think I’ll save that.

First of all, let me put any assumptions to rest. The character that my heroine was based from is NOT “Jean Grey.” Yes, I used that picture, and yes, I used that name, but I had alternative reasons for doing do.

Let me lay any suppositions to rest. I assure you, I hate Jean Grey.

I loathe her.

I despise her.

debbiphoenix

I despise her in every incarnation, comic, novel, movie or otherwise. (Again, not talking Phoenix here. Just. Jean Grey.) And I despise her because of the characterization they (did not) give her in the early 80’s. (Stuck in the 80’s. Yes, it’s a thing.) There was potential there. There’s always potential. The (male) writers of the Uncanny X-Men comics blew it. And yes, let me be clear. I blame it on the male writers of that era who were in charge of story-lines (She was the/an original “Mary Sue”). I hate her.

X-Men? Arguably one of my favorite comic book times/teams ever. Probably top four, anyway. But I will not – cannot – go to movies in which Jean Grey stars. It is that bad. I can’t get past it. I’m irrational. I know. But then again: I just hate her.

If you see me out, and ever want to either ruin a perfectly good mood, or argue until they come and physically remove me, please, bring up Jean Grey.

Now that we have that established.

We return to Jean. And so there won’t be any more confusion, she goes by Anda in real/written life. You may recall, I felt like she was too close to a comic book character template — not Jean Grey — and not of the Marvel Universe, for that matter. Raven, actually, of Teen Titans fame. I did send more detailed notes to the writing partner I mentioned before, and she agreed: Eh. Yep. That’s … really too close.

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BUT!

Hubby is the comic goon in our household. I know a heck of a lot about mutants. He knows a heck of a lot about the Comic Universes. All. Of. Them. He went on a research spree and dug up what I thought were similarities between Anda and “Raven” were non-existent. Until the cartoon resurgence of Raven in the last five years.

raven_teen_titans_go

In other words, the backstory for Anda would have never been an issue, had we published the book a decade ago. Raven’s backstory was safely distant enough and different enough to not interfere. Now however, the cartoon version has made Raven’s backstory more bite-sized and it sounds … too close. Despite the fact that I have a 2003’s Library of Congress seal of approval copyright ©, no one would buy on face value that we did it first.

 

On the other hand, I don’t feel nearly as anxious about it now, either. Because, dammit, we did do it first, and Raven’s backstory was different. Not very different, but more different than it is now since it’s been changed no less than three times since her inception.

fb69e1981dc8e43e18b4c81c59512e61 There are still issues my partner brought up that are legitimate. Mainly regarding Anda’s parents. How they would look, how they would act. … Why they would be together. Or why get together for that matter. Or have a child. Or would it be children? But I’m slogging through. Slowly but surely. (And if anyone has any suggestions on the above questions, please don’t hesitate to send them to me.)

 

All that blustering to say that changes are in the works — if not in effect — by the time you read this. And what we kept doesn’t bother me like it did before.   anda_cropped

So, Yay!

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